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Remittance: What Is It And Does It Affect GDP?

A remittance transfer is a money transfer from one person to another, typically from one country to another. The remittance sender typically sends the money through a bank or other financial institution, which then forwards the money to the recipient’s bank or financial institution. The sender may also send the money directly to the recipient, using a service such as Western Union.  

The sender usually pays a fee for the service, which can vary depending on the amount of money being sent, the destination country, and the method of payment (such as cash, credit card, or bank transfer). The recipient may also be charged a fee by their bank or financial institution.  

When sending a remittance, the sender will typically need to provide their details (such as name, address, and date of birth), the recipient’s personal details (such as name and address), and account number. In addition, the sender will also need to specify the amount of money being sent and the currency.

Who Provides Remittance Services?

The primary providers of remittance transfers are banks, credit unions, and money transfer companies. Each of these entities has its own process for sending and receiving remittance transfers.  

Banks typically allow customers to send money to another person or entity through their online banking platform. The sender will need to have the recipient’s bank account information to initiate the transfer. Once the transfer is complete, the recipient will receive the funds in their bank account.  

Credit unions typically offer a similar service to banks, allowing members to send money to others through their online banking platform. The sender will need the recipient’s credit union account information to initiate the transfer. Once the transfer is complete, the recipient will receive the funds in their credit union account.  

Money transfer companies typically allow customers to send money to others through their online platform or in person at physical locations. The sender will need the recipient’s bank account information or mobile phone number to initiate the transfer. Once the transfer is complete, the recipient will receive the funds in their bank account or via a mobile wallet.

Benefits & Drawbacks Of Remittance Transfers

The main benefit of remittance transfers is that they are convenient and typically quick. For example, a wire transfer can be completed in just a few days, whereas a check or money order can take up to two weeks to clear. Additionally, remittance transfers can be made online or in person at a bank, making them accessible to everyone.  

However, there are also some drawbacks to using remittance transfers:

  1. They can be expensive. For example, the sender may have to pay a fee to the bank for the service.
  2. There is always the risk that the funds will not arrive at their destination or that someone will intercept them en route.
  3. Remittance transfers are not typically reversible, so if the recipient does not receive the funds as expected, the sender may not be able to get their money back.

GDP Impact Of Money Flows

Remittance transfers can have a significant impact on a country’s GDP. The most recent data from the World Bank shows that remittances to developing countries totaled $429 billion in 2016, up from $404 billion in 2015. It represents a significant increase from the past $266 billion in remittances recorded earlier.

Some experts believe that remittances could positively impact GDP growth in certain countries. For example, in 2016, the World Bank estimated that remittances to developing countries would grow by 3.4% in 2017, representing a significant increase from the 2.7% growth rate in 2016.  

The countries most likely to experience positive impacts from remittances are those where a large percentage of the population is living abroad and sending money home. 

Some of the top countries in this category include India, Mexico, the Philippines, and Nigeria. In addition, countries with high economic growth rates are also more likely to see positive impacts from remittances, as the extra money can help fuel consumption and investment.